Antidote 10 User Guide

User Guide / The Corrector / Types of Detections and Underlining

Types of Detections and Underlining

Underlining colours

Antidote uses two colours, red and orange, to present its correction results. These colours apply to different types of errors and they help you to determine which should be addressed first.

In the Language view, the red underlining is more striking and serves to indicate the most important errors. The orange underlining, which is more discreet, is used for a word which may be a possible error. The red underlining may be solid or dotted. The orange underlining may be thin or wavy. The following paragraphs explain how each type of underlining is used in Antidote.

Solid red underlining: a corrected error waiting for approval

Solid red underlining flags a major error that Antidote can correct on its own: in the tooltip, it displays the proposed correction in green. You need only approve it to have it applied in the text. If you refuse the proposed correction, your text is not modified.

  • In the list in the right-hand panel, these detections are grouped under Errors.

Dotted red underlining: an error to correct manually or an inconsistent spelling

Dotted red underlining flags a major error that Antidote can’t correct on its own: it’s up to you to modify the text.

  • In the list of the right-hand panel, these detections are grouped under Errors. In the example shown to the right, the corrector detected an incoherent date but can’t correct it because it doesn’t know what was intended: June 30 or July 31.

You can make the correction directly in the correction panel by clicking the Edit option in the tooltip, or by returning to your original document. The context (right click) menu option Edit in original document will take you quickly to the word to be modified.

Inconsistent spelling

Antidote can detect cases where different spellings are used for the same word within the same text (e.g.: ax and axe). It underlines the less frequent spelling in the correction panel and groups together all the variant spellings in the Inconsistencies section in the list of detections. The tooltip will propose the most plausible replacement for each of these variant spellings: simply click on Make uniform to standardize the spelling across the text.

Thin orange underlining: an alert

Thin orange underlining flags an alert, i.e. a potential error. Antidote indicates that this word may be an error, but it’s up to you to decide.

This may be because you are using a word that is unknown to Antidote or a word that is perhaps inappropriate in the context (e.g.: clod is an informal word in the sense of “a dull person” but not in the sense of “lump of earth”).

If Antidote was right in signalling this alert, you can rephrase the text with the help of the suggestions provided in its tooltip. You can also use the context (right click) menu to look for a replacement synonym (select Synonyms of “word”).

  • The settings allow you to customize the alerts (see the Settings chapter).
  • In the list of the right-hand panel, these potential errors are grouped under Alerts or Unknown words, as appropriate.

Wavy orange underlining: several possible spellings

In a few cases, the corrector might come up with two or more competing spellings for a word. Wavy orange underlining indicates words for which the original word may be correct, but other spellings are possible according to the intended meaning. In the tooltip, Antidote shows all these spellings. If the original spelling is correct, click Ignore in the tooltip to move on. Otherwise, choose the spelling that best fits the context, and then approve the correction to have it applied in the text.

  • In the list of the right-hand panel, these potential errors are grouped under Ambiguities.

Dotted orange underlining: discontinuities

Sometimes, Antidote may have trouble analyzing a sentence in its entirety, unable to identify the exact syntactic function of each word in relation to others. Generally, this is caused by a complex error, such as a missing or superfluous word. Antidote underlines the affected area with a dotted orange line.

Examine the words in and around the underlined passage to detect the error. If needed, use the dictionaries and guides to check your word usage. Once you understand any errors, you must correct them manually. Once you have finished, the corrector will see your changes and will reanalyze the sentence. If the problem that prevented correct analysis is eliminated, you may see new errors or alerts that didn’t appear before.

Discontinuities are not always caused by errors. They may be the result of unusual elements or syntax structures that Antidote is not familiar with. If this is the case, try temporarily removing the elements in question so that the corrector can complete its analysis. Otherwise, you can simply ignore the discontinutity and move onto the next detection.

  • Important: In areas where discontinuities occur, Antidote’s corrections are less reliable. It may both miss errors and make false detections. To warn you of its uncertainty, it adds the warning To review to the tooltip.
  • In the list (right-hand panel), these detections are grouped under Discontinuities.

Thick orange underlining: a corrected typographical error waiting for approval

  • To view these detections, you must select the Typography view (left-hand panel).

The thick orange underlining indicates a typographical error (apostrophe, space, quotation mark, number or time format, etc.) that Antidote can correct on its own. In the tooltip, Antidote displays a brief explanation of the flagged problem. You need only approve it to have it applied in the text. If you refuse the proposed correction, your text is not modified.

Thick dotted orange underlining: a typographical error to correct manually

  • To view these detections, you must select the Typography view (left-hand panel).

A thick dotted orange underlining indicates a typographical detection that Antidote cannot correct on its own. To make any corrections, you must modify the text manually by following the indications in the tooltip.

Syntactic category and function tooltip

The Syntactic category and function tooltip describes the syntactic category and function of each element of the sentence (word, expression, punctuation, etc.). To display it, select Syntactic category and function in the context menu (right click). The category and function then appear under the selected item.